Kumiko That Symbolises Japanese Wood Craftsmanship

20 ––– 01 ––– 2020

In Japanese architecture, various designs have been used from centuries ago to partition spaces inside buildings. For example, fittings such as ‘Shoji’ screens or latticework have various characteristics allowing light to go through to an area providing beautiful shades and contrast. Shoji screen panels are often fitted into a fixed position combined with movable sideway movements.

There is another type of fitting called ‘Kumiko’ that has high artistic value and are prized possessions. Kumiko is hand crafted using an ancient technique assembling fine cut wood pieces to create beautiful patterns without using a single nail or screw. This technique represents true Japanese wood craftsmanship that can not be replicated by machines in today’s world.

There are various customised design configurations that can be produced from square, circular to odd shapes, patterns and sizes. The traditional Japanese designs, such as “Seigaiha” that expresses ocean waves, and “Sippou” that has regularly aligned circles are examples of how Kumiko can be expressed uniquely.